PPS and Simm staff get on their bikes

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After his father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in early 2016, PPS engineer Chris Speight decided to organise a special fundraising bike ride for Prostate Cancer UK. The charity supports those with prostate cancer and leads change to help more men survive the disease.

Photo showing Pennine Pneumatic Services compressed air engineer chris speight
PPS Engineer Chris Speight

On Sunday 16 September 2018, Chris and half a dozen of his work colleagues will follow a route of about 35 miles, from the new PPS offices in Brighouse to sister company, Simm Engineering, in Sheffield.

The cycle ride will start in Brighouse at 9am and follow a route through Huddersfield before joining Penistone Road and finally taking the A61 into Sheffield and the Simm offices at Gilbertson Works, Jessell Street in the city centre. The group expects to arrive by 12 noon, when Chris will give a thank you speech.

The riders range in proficiency; Chris is a keen cyclist but some of the others taking part have less experience.

Chris’s father, who has made a full recovery since an operation on his prostate in 2016, will meet the riders at around the half-way point for a refreshment stop and there are other supporters coming along in vans to take the riders back home afterwards.

Chris says: “I had it in my head for a while to do a charity bike ride, as a few of us at work are keen on cycling. The response has been great, there has been a lot of support and more people than I thought are taking part. I’ll be on my second-hand road bike, which I bought for £50 and have done up over the years.”

Chris and his colleagues are hoping to raise £750 for this very worthy cause. If you would like to donate, please visit: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ppssimmcycle

What is prostate cancer?
One in eight men in the UK will get prostate cancer, with 40,000 new cases diagnosed each year. It develops when the cells in the prostate – a walnut-sized gland found in the pelvis between the bladder and the penis – begin to grow in an uncontrolled way.

In some cases it will not cause any problems, but in cases where the cells grow faster and/or the cancer spreads beyond the area, it will require treatment and can be life threatening. Symptoms include problems associated with urinating, but because prostate cancer can develop without noticeable symptoms, it’s important for men to get their prostate checked, especially after the age of 50, or younger if there are incidences of prostate cancer in the family.

For more information, visit:
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/prostate-cancer/
https://prostatecanceruk.org/
https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/prostate-cancer

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